S&P 100

2632.35

0.23%

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Today S&P 100 Share Price Performance

  • $2,617.95
    $2,632.8
  • $1,932.1
    $2,632.8
1 Month Return+ 3.99 %
3 Month Return+ 8.52 %
1 Year Return+ 26.88 %
Previous Close$2626.19
Open$2624.05

Overview

S&P 100 is a stock market index that tracks the performance of 100 large, publicly-owned companies listed on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) and the Nasdaq.
Exchange

S&P 100 Index

The S&P 100 Index is a stock market index consisting of 100 leading U.S. stocks across various industries. It is a subset of the broader S&P 500 Index and includes large-cap companies that are considered leaders in their respective sectors. The S&P 100 is a capitalization-weighted index, meaning the companies with the largest market values have the greatest impact on the index's performance.

Factors Affecting the S&P 100 Index

Several factors can influence the performance of the S&P 100 Index:

Economic Conditions: Macroeconomic indicators such as GDP growth, inflation rates, unemployment rates, and consumer spending influence investor sentiment and corporate profitability, impacting the S&P 100.

Corporate Earnings: The quarterly earnings reports of the companies within the S&P 100 significantly impact the index. Positive earnings surprises can drive stock prices higher, while disappointing results can lead to declines.

Interest Rates: Interest rate changes, primarily influenced by the Federal Reserve, affect borrowing costs and investment decisions. Lower interest rates generally support higher stock prices, while higher rates can pressure them.

Global Events: Geopolitical events, trade policies, and international economic conditions can impact the S&P 100. For instance, trade wars, political instability, or global pandemics can create volatility in the markets.

Sector Performance: The S&P 100 includes companies from various sectors such as technology, healthcare, financials, and consumer goods. Performance in these sectors can significantly influence the index. For example, a boom in technology stocks can drive the index higher.

Market Sentiment: Investor sentiment, driven by news, analyst reports, and broader market trends, can influence stock prices. Bullish sentiment often leads to higher stock prices, while bearish sentiment can result in declines.

History of the S&P 100

The S&P 100 Index was introduced in 1983 by Standard & Poor's, now part of S&P Global. It was created to provide a benchmark for large-cap stocks, offering a more focused view of the U.S. stock market compared to the broader S&P 500 Index.

Over the years, the S&P 100 has evolved to include some of the most influential and well-known companies in the world. Its components are leaders in their industries, including technology giants like Apple and Microsoft, healthcare leaders like Johnson & Johnson, and financial powerhouses like JPMorgan Chase.

The S&P 100 has witnessed significant market events, including the dot-com bubble in the late 1990s, the financial crisis of 2008, and the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite these challenges, the index has demonstrated resilience and continues to be a key barometer for large-cap U.S. equities.

S&P 100 Calculations

The S&P 100 is calculated using a market-capitalization-weighted methodology. Here’s a simplified breakdown of the calculation process:

Market Capitalization: Calculate the market capitalization of each component stock by multiplying its share price by the total number of outstanding shares.

Total Market Capitalization: Sum the market capitalizations of all 100 companies in the index.

Index Value: The index value is derived by dividing the total market capitalization by a divisor. This divisor is adjusted periodically to maintain continuity in the index value, especially when there are stock splits, dividends, or other corporate actions.

Weighting: Each stock's weight in the index is determined by its market capitalization relative to the total market capitalization of all the stocks in the index.

The S&P 100 is subject to periodic rebalancing to ensure it continues to represent the large-cap segment of the U.S. equity market accurately. This involves adjusting the weights of the component stocks and occasionally adding or removing stocks based on their market capitalizations and sector representations.

FAQs on S&P 100

The S&P 100 Index is a stock market index comprising 100 of the largest and most established companies listed on U.S. stock exchanges. It is a subset of the broader S&P 500 Index and includes large-cap companies that are leaders in their respective industries.

The S&P 100 Index includes 100 of the largest companies from the S&P 500 Index, providing a more focused view on large-cap stocks. The S&P 500 Index, on the other hand, includes 500 companies and offers a broader representation of the U.S. stock market.

The S&P 100 Index covers a wide range of sectors, including technology, healthcare, financials, consumer goods, energy, and industrials, among others. This diversification helps provide a comprehensive overview of the performance of major industries.

The S&P 100 Index is periodically rebalanced to ensure it continues to accurately represent the large-cap segment of the U.S. equity market. Rebalancing involves adjusting the weights of the component stocks and may include adding or removing stocks based on their market capitalizations and sector representations.

The S&P 100 Index is an important benchmark for large-cap U.S. equities. It includes some of the most influential companies in the world, making it a key indicator of the performance of major U.S. industries. Investors and analysts use the S&P 100 to assess market trends, economic conditions, and investment opportunities.